Recommended Books

Ravi Zacharias has been defending the Gospel for many years, and with the rise of ‘new atheism’ he faces off against what some have termed ‘big science’ – the atheistic community’s ham-fisted attempt to silence any dissent to naturalist evolution. The anti-Christian movement, promoting a sort of ‘pop atheism’ that usually attacks Christians themselves rather than the scientific theories of creationists, has many vocal proponents. Sam Harris, author of ‘Letter to a Christian Nation’, is specifically addressed in Ravi’s book, with others dealt with obliquely, each taken to task for their errors. But this is not simply a reverse-attack on Harris or the others; Zacharias cuts to the core of the atheist problem and presents a case for truth resolving itself in a presentation of God in the person of Jesus Christ as the intelligence behind the universe, and the end (the culmination, not the cessation) of reason.

Jesus wasn’t afraid of confrontation. He was humble and compassionate, but he could also pierce the hearts of those who needed correction. In The Jesus You Can’t Ignore, John MacArthur takes a closer look at Jesus’ interactions with the Pharisees, the Sadducees and anyone else whose motives were tainted. Explore the passionate side of Jesus and let MacArthur’s teaching awaken in you a desire to stand up for God’s truth and honor.

The Bondage of the Will, Luther’s exposition on the doctrine of God’s sovereignty, laid the groundwork for Reformation thought. It shows us a humbling view of ourselves while strengthening our faith in Christ.

The Ambassador Classics series brings the greatest classic works of Christian history into a single set. It includes unabridged works by Martin Luther, John Bunyan, John Calvin, A. T. Pierson, John Owens, C. H. Spurgeon, Jonathan Edwards, J. C. Ryle, R. A. Torrey and many others. This series will continue to enrich and deepen your faith in Christ.

The Christian church has a long tradition of systematic theology, that is, studying theology and doctrine organized around fairly standard categories such as the Word of God, redemption, and Jesus Christ. This introductory textbook on systematic theology has several distinctive features:

  • A strong emphasis on the scriptural basis for each doctrine and teaching
  • Clear writing, with technical terms kept to a minimum
  • A contemporary approach, treating subjects of special interest to the church today
  • A friendly tone, appealing to the emotions and the spirit as well as the intellect
  • Frequent application to life
  • Resources for worship with each chapter
  • Bibliographies with each chapter that cross-reference subjects to a wide range of other systematic theologies

With millions of copies in print, Foxe’s Book of Martyrs has become a classic of magnificent courage and faith. This unparalleled volume chronicles the tragic yet triumphant stories of men and women who faced torture and martyrdom rather than deny their vision of truth and of God. Beginning with Jesus Christ, this exceptional historical record traces the roots of religious persecution through the sixteenth century. It examines the heroic lives of great men and women such as John Hus, John Wycliffe, William Tyndale, Anne Askew, Lady Jane Grey, and Martin Luther. John Foxe also knew persecution. Forced to flee from his native England to Europe during Queen Mary’s severe persecution of those holding Reformed views, he carefully compiled records of martyred Christians. His writings possess a sense of immediacy and insight into suffering that few “objective” church historians can match. This edition has been streamlined and reorganized by W. Grinton Berry to present work in today’s language.

Norman Geisler and Frank Turek show, first of all, that truth is absolute, exclusive, and knowable. From there, they proceed to demonstrate that the cardinal Christian doctrines are true beyond reasonable doubt, all convincing for you as a Christians to believe, but requiring a leap of negative “faith” if an atheist is to disbelieve them.

The charismatic movement has made an impact on the church unparalleled in history. But one legacy of the movement is confusion and mushy thinking. In Charismatic Chaos, John MacArthur calls for biblical evaluation and analyzes the doctrinal differences between charismatics and non-charismatics in the light of Scripture.

“My principal concern,” writes MacArthur, “is to call the church to a firm commitment to the purity and authority of the Scriptures, and thereby to strengthen the unity of the true church.” To tough questions that seem to divide, Charismatic Chaos provides tougher answers that strive to unite. This book tackles such questions as:

  • Is experience a valid test of truth?
  • Does God still give revelation?
  • Prophets, fanatics, or heretics?
  • Does God still heal?
  • What should we think of the Signs and Wonders movement?
  • Does the Bible promise health and wealth?

Encouraging readers to be more discerning and discriminating in their elucidation of Scripture, Carson exposes improper techniques of biblical interpretation. He groups exegetical errors into categories of word study, grammar, and logic, refuting common misconceptions in a straightforward and accessible style. A working knowledge of Greek and Hebrew is helpful but not necessary.

 

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